Oct. 5, 2020

EP 6: A Visit with Dr. Naveed Shan

EP 6: A Visit with Dr. Naveed Shan

Dr. Shan comes on the show to share his story and shed light on the idea that any thing is possible with the right mindset, drive and a plan. Hear from one of today's brightest physical therapist, who's story will motivate and inspire many.

Transcript
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You are now listening to the Project Life podcast where we take project management concepts and apply them to your everyday life. broadcasting from the Lone Star State in Austin, Texas. Help me welcome your host, Mr. George Lopez. Hey, what is going on guys, my name is George Lopez and welcome to episode six of the Project Life podcast. And today is gonna be very similar to last week, everybody, where we had our guests, Oscar encounters successful businessman here in the state of Texas. This week, I'm super excited, because I got my good buddy, Dr. Beat Shawn joining us here shortly, to give us his story and to give us you know, his perspective on this thought process that we can project ties our lives, and go from making vast improvements within our lives by using some of these concepts into think that things that we want to accomplish can be broken down into small bite sized chunks, if you want to call it in, even to the point to where you can conceptually make them into a project and make that part of your life, whether it's something from losing weight to going back to school, to starting a new business to turning your life around, in some cases. And that's, you know, when I started this podcast, and when I started the whole this whole idea, you know, Dr. Novi Chang was one of the first people that I thought of, because me and him go way back, we went to college together, we're fraternity brothers. And he was one of the ones that I really saw, you know, take charge of his life. And I and I don't want to spill all the beans, but I'll let him talk about but he took charge in his life, made a plan stuck to it. And statistically, guys, just to kind of let you guys know, like where we grew up in the areas of Phoenix, Arizona, there are not a lot of people that you know, would quote unquote, make it from, from where we are, and to now see him flourish and blossom and to become one of the best physical therapists in the state of Arizona. You know, it's an honor and a privilege to have him on the show, and to tell his story, but he was one of the ones because we do have a very close relationship that I thought of, as I started to build my plan for this podcast. Naveed was one of those guys that I just add to this day, I feed off his inspiration and use him as almost even though we're right around the same age as almost a mentor and someone that I look up to in life because I saw him make a plan. stick to it. And to see him go into his bathroom, the girls getting into the game, his doctors coming in passing on his boys passing off you being with you, you know, it just it fills my heart Oh joy, to see what he's done and the inspiration that He has given me that a plan to then take my career within the military. And then on to the civilian side to 10 years later, it'll be the years later main reasons on why I want to start this podcast. So without further ado, everybody to see your let me welcome to the years Mr. Dr. avi cha inspiration for me, as I've continued with my career, but if you can, brother, can you give us just like a little backstory like you know who you are. Where'd you come from? And how did you get to the point you are now? Yeah, for sure. I appreciate that, man. Thank you for the kind words. Well, yeah, again, my name is john. from Phoenix, Arizona, Phoenix specifically. I met I met George we're both at ASU. Actually. I think he's the only he's only a year ahead of me. Or you're behind me. So yeah, we're we're pretty cool. Man. We've known each other for 15 years. Yeah. That's crazy to think about. But yeah, went to went to ASU met George joined a great a great fraternity had a lot of long lasting bonds and lifetime bonds with that. Didn't when I got the issue, I didn't really know what I wanted to do. I had certain certain thoughts and expectations of myself but it ended up being not not even my own expectations or aspirations. And it took me a little while to get to a point where I figured it out and I know what I wanted to do. Grew up and grew up in Phoenix. raised there went to ASU study to psychology and exercise and wellness decided to take a little break, see what I can do. In the after that after I graduated with those degrees and realized that I needed to I wanted something new More and I wanted, I didn't reach my full potential, I went back to school. And I wanted to do something that helped people. And I like the idea of being in healthcare, and so on. Yeah became a. Jordan mentioned at my doctorate in physical therapy. So I'm a physical therapist. Now. I work in the emergency department setting. So it's a little bit a little bit faster pace. works perfect for my attention span. I also own my own business, Shawn physical therapy. So it's a, it's a cash pay physical therapy clinic, and how to do some online consultations through that. And like doing man to compete in powerlifting, and strongman and I enjoy cooking and hanging out my dog at home. Most definitely, man. So you know, you have quite a quite a set of adventures in one thing that I did mention in the intro is, you know, guys like us, you know, from from where we came from growing up in south Phoenix, there was, I guess the odds are stacked against us to quote unquote, kind of make it and get it in kind of come out of those situations, I guess, for you at what point? Or, you know, what, what was it for you that kind of helped you kind of come over the hump, and get past some of the hurdles that we see in those communities? Yeah, I think about that question a lot. And, unfortunately, I'm the, I'm the exception to the rule, like I work in, I still work within my community. So I'll get a lot of people from, from my neighborhood, from my background, we're about the same age maybe a little bit younger than me. And, you know, I think about it in most of my successes, you know, I won't, I won't ever say I don't work hard, or I don't have a good work ethic. But both of my bad both the things that accomplishment, took a chance on me and gave me an opportunity helped me when I needed it. And I don't think everybody has the same opportunities that I had, you know, we grew up, we didn't have a lot of money, just like everybody else without being a single parent household. My dad wasn't around a lot. So my mom did it on my own on her own, and I look back on everything she did. To get me where I am. And it was really, it was really because of her. Really, every every, every good thing about me, I developed as a trader, characteristic I got from my mom, I'm very grateful for that. And you know that the odds are stacked against a lot of people, I mean, the they don't have, they don't have the same opportunities, they don't have the same resources, they don't have the same public school education, as you know, somewhere from someone from a nicer part of town. So we also wonder why, you know, people stay in that community and people can grow people don't can advance their education worth a lot more difficult compared to someone else. So I, I think it's, I really a big part of it was a lot of, for me, my successes, a lot of people helped me when I needed it. A lot of people gave me some great advice. I had some great mentors and guidance, but mostly my mother, I mean, she just wouldn't, she gave she sacrificed so much for me to get to the point where I am now that needed be anything less than where I am now would be would be disrespectful to her. In the same way, my mom and myself, we had a great relationship growing up, and she allowed me to, you know, afforded me a lot of the opportunities both my parents did afforded me the opportunities that others didn't. Would you say that, you know, based on, you know, the the course of your career, and I think we all kind of hit that wall in college where it's just, I don't know what I want to do with my life. At what point did you just have to sit down with yourself and make that plan? They say, hey, it, there's more to the fun, you know, and look towards the future and know that you can really make that that change in your life. Yeah, man. So I think there's, there was just a point I got, I got Yes, you are. Okay. It was just, there was a point in my life. I was just, I was sick of my own bullshit. I was sick of the lie. I was telling myself and the excuses I gave myself to not succeed. So I kind of chronologically, I messed up my story when you asked me to tell you about myself. So I originally just was getting a degree in psychology and I didn't finish my degree, and I stopped going to school because I was like, man, what's the point? And I was just miserable. I was angry. I was saying they're out on my, on my my girlfriend at the time. I wasn't I wasn't very happy. When I was around, I was just kind of a miserable guy. And I didn't know why. I didn't know why I wasn't happy. I didn't know why I didn't succeed. I just thought I wasn't, I wasn't smart enough, I didn't have all the, all the privilege, all the opportunities other people had. And I just, you know, I think I was maybe 2122 at the time. And I was just like, Man, that's enough. Like, you're really the only person that's stopping you. There's people that have that have gone a lot further with a lot less, and I just needed to stop telling myself alive, stop, you know, stop comparing myself in this like, well, it's okay, you're good you did as much as you can. And I really looking back at that time, when I was looking back, I wasn't trying my best, I wasn't putting my best foot forward, I wasn't putting in the effort that I needed to to, you know, be successful. So it was that moment. And I remember just sitting in my backyard, you know, probably negative $300 in my bank account, super angry. And just wondering, like, how did I get here, and I realized it was because of me, it was my, you know, it was just the decisions I made up into that point in time brought me there. So it was really like, I couldn't blame anybody else. But it was also a beautiful moment, because I realized, like, Oh, you got to get your shit together, you got to lace up your bootstraps, you got to start moving. Because nobody, you're not going to succeed. Unless you put that effort forward, unless you take advantage of opportunities that are presented to you, unless you start working harder than you are now. Because everything you're doing is not working. So that was a very, that was a very major turning point in my life, where I went from, you know, essentially being a college dropout with like, a 2.57 GPA, I couldn't even I mean, I, I had no job opportunities, because I didn't have I didn't have a degree at the time like, and I went once I had that turning point and stop lying to myself, I was able to succeed man, I was crushing it at school. I think I averaged like a 4.18 GPA, the entire my entire degree, my exercise and wellness degree, I was working full time I was making, you know, great money and make great financial, financial decisions that helped me in the future. And, you know, that was a huge turning point in my life, every everything was a lot more positive than on now. Yeah, most definitely. in it. And I think it was it was that in those are the times that again, I was purposely kind of trying to draw it out of you. But, you know, even sent back from, you know, as a friend, we saw it, we saw the the shift in mindset, and we saw the determination, and you sit for the path for yourself in a plane, and we just saw you just go after, and then it hasn't stopped from that point. And one of the things that I consistently talk about on on the show, in regards to setting that, that that plan, I think is also understanding, those are those that can be impacted by the choices that you make in other, you know, in project management, we call them other key stakeholders. But can you touch on that because I know you have a few people that you know, absolutely means the world to you. And we're a part of this kind of flipping of the switch mentally as well as you know, giving you that that drive to push forward in to really hit you know, your stride to be the best version of yourself. Um, man, you know, there were there were a lot of there are a lot of I think people that just, you know, said something to me, or, you know, we're, you know, just doing great things. And I thought I was like, Man, I'm not doing that. But specifically one guy wanted to being a mentor of mine later on his name was Martin Rooney. And he was a physical therapist. And I read it, but I randomly read an article. And it was called climbing, I think it's called climbing your own Mount Everest. And it was that just kind of was a trigger for me, it just flipped the switch. I had the quote, man, I'm gonna attach to that quote on my forum or something, but that was kind of a big thing where it was. It was a big turning switch or a turning point. And it just flipped the switch like, man I, I have that ability, like there's nothing that he's done. And this guy was a world renowned strength coach, being being flown out to every every part of the world to teach or coach or train or do something. He had this this way and motivating people and, and helping people and guiding people towards him. And he had this like this, his charisma you wouldn't believe. And I mean, I've seen the guy maybe once every four, three or four or five years, and he remembers maniac means like, from What's going on brother? I think we lost you there. Just got disconnected. I lost you there. So I lost you right after you said you guys had really seen each other about every four to five years. Okay, that's kind of where we were we lost yet. Um, yeah, so I only see him every four or five years. But you remember me like it was yesterday, man. And yeah, that was a big life changer. And that was a big kind of push in that direction. him you know, my brothers and me, I always bring up my brother Sammy a lot. Both I don't know, he is. He has autism and cerebral palsy. And he's, he, he's been a big motivator and my wife to do better, I want him to be comfortable. I want him to have all the things that he need for the rest of his life. He's, he'll never be, you know, independent, you'll never be able to have a job or a family or, or be on his own. So, you know, for me, it's just like, you know, like you, George, when you live, when you see your daughter, man, you want to give her the world? For me. I wouldn't say he's my son, but he's someone I want to be comfortable the rest of his life. And he's someone that that makes me continue to push to be more to do better to, to, to be a better person. Yeah, no, Sam, Sam, he is is a great person. And he's, you know, I think he's touched pretty much anyone's life who's been a part of your life. And I definitely know, you know, what a key key motivator he he is to help you in even, you know, even when you hit hit that wall, you know, I know he was part of, you know, helping flip that switch to know that your brother, you wanted more for your brother, and, you know, in you had the opportunity to give him that in to ensure that and kind of, you know, help set that plan and get that plan in motion to get you are, where you are today. Now along the way, just because as it always happens, just like in any project in, in, in life in itself, I'm sure you've you've hit some some road bumps along the way, and maybe had to divert and reroute your plan along the way. Is that something that that you've dealt with? And how have you overcome some of that when you hit some of those struggles? Because again, I know, between taking the MCAT and trying to do clinicals and work full time, you know, becoming a doctor isn't isn't the easiest task for but, you know, what were some of those roadblocks and how'd you overcome them yourself? Man, so many roadblocks. It's like what, quote Wasn't that a man that someone doesn't. So someone does doesn't know failure, they need to go buy a lotto ticket. I think I think every every turning point and there's always been some some level of difficulty, nothing. Nothing has come like really easy even going back to school and not have financial aid. So literally having to work 40 to 40 to 60 hours a week to pay tuition. Because I couldn't get financial aid, I didn't qualify for scholarships at the time. So struggling with that having to pay for that. the difficulties of school, I mean, you know, school, the grad school, PT school wasn't it's tough, it's a challenge, but it's still manageable. I think the harder part was relationships, maintaining relationships and friendships and you know, the stress it puts on that, not being able to be there for for people you know, and having to go through through breakups and having a you know, distance yourself from certain people just to see those that was very difficult. And the financial, the financial aspects of school and working through it and eventually working for free. And working to be able to work for free was also very trial and that to be able to get to a place to start my business was very difficult. But I, I think when I've right here that like how do you get, get get around obstacles, and I'm always reminded of a book by Ryan Holiday called the optimal is a way and I really tried to change my outlook on on these obstacles. where it's like, man, there's just always something there's always something that stops you or that doesn't want you to doesn't want you to complete that task or you know, succeed. And I don't I stopped looking at it that way. I stopped looking at it. I started looking at it like this This obstacle, whatever road bump it is, whatever financial hit, you take whatever, you know physical, physical or mental or, like, social issue you have, that's part of the, that's part of your path that wasn't that supposed to be there. Um, it might not be the easiest route, but that that that was a part of the path that you're supposed to take. So you need to accept that, that it's there and you got to work towards it, and accepting what Evers on you and addressing that before you can go forward. Because if you stop and you stop, and you've got to work around every single way, it's going to take a lot, it's going to take a lot more out of you than just trying to push forward and succeed with, you know, whatever's in front of you and adding that, you know, whether it's like a financial issue, whether it's a family issue, because you can't ignore those things, because they're going to be there, when you stop, you got to address them, you gotta, you gotta address them and do what you can try to find a resolution and keep moving forward, but not necessarily trying to work around it. That's it. That's my opinion anyway, for what I've gone through. Yeah, most definitely, you know, I always looked at it, you know, as I as I revolve around all this stuff, and I try to emulate what I do at work to what I do at home, in kind of trying to tie it all together, you know, as you make adjustments, because there's going to be roadblocks, you know, I hit roadblocks at work every day for project, but ensuring to want to be more successful, but to reflect on that, and to look at life. And it's one of those things to where, hey, you know, it's going to come in, it's always just really just how you adjust to weather. You know, I think a lot of people either take it one or two ways you take it like yourself, and you continue to drive on or you let it defeat you. And if you come to the mindset of knowing that there are going to be roadblocks along the way. And, you know, for me, I am I consider myself a planner, and I try to again, you're not going to be able to see every roadblock that comes comes along the way but I think when people at least try to do their due diligence, you know, on something as they dive into something, you know, it can at least help prepare that, you know, there is going to be a huge time commitment, I'm sure for you, as you looked into grad school, like you had to understand, you know, what the time commitment was going to be that you walked into it knowing that, you know, some of your relationships were we're going to take a hit. And I think for you, it probably tested some of the people that were true friends and things of that sort based on that. But I think you you yourself, probably walked into kind of knowing and setting your own expectations on which you were about to get yourself into Is that a fair assessment? Yeah, that was a percent. Like I kind of, I don't want to say I'm a pessimist, but I try to look at things like pragmatically like, I try to look at things as they are and not what I hoped them to be. Or also not the worst case scenario. And so yeah, I go in with that. And I think your, your approach to like, whatever it is, whatever project you have in front of you, if you go with a pragmatic view, and you know, and understanding that, you know, things aren't going to be easy, things might go awry things might not be is it's not going to be a smooth transition, like it is on paper, if you have that out outlook, as opposed to, oh, this is going to be easy, this is going to be a breeze, there's not going to be any issues. Then, you know, you're setting yourself up for failure at the very least disappointment. And then if you if you go on with the super pessimistic, like, nothing's gonna work, I'm going to fail, it's not going to happen here. You're probably it's probably gonna fail. It's gonna if you're thinking doom and gloom, it's gonna probably end up that way. Yeah, most definitely. And, and I've touched on on the podcast along the way, you know, one of the biggest quote unquote projects that I think a lot of people go to in, in unprepared is things just like being healthy and losing weight, right? Like, we're, we're at that point of the year, we're December's around the corner, January is around the corner, and everyone makes that New Year's resolution that, you know, I want to lose weight and, and but they they make it January 1, and and they don't go and prep themselves or understand what it takes. What a diet takes what, you know, what really goes into, you know, how many times Am I going to go to gym, how much you know, what kind of diet Am I really going to be on? A lot of people just end up January 1, here I am I want to lose weight. And then two weeks later, you know that it's there. They've lost any of that quote unquote, resolution for the year because they failed to plan in again that that's my opinion. And that's kind of what driven the show was, hey, if you just maybe planned in December, you know for this something as small as I want to shed a few pounds at the beginning of the year. But if you took Maybe a couple of weeks to actually look into it understand the time commitment understand what the requirements are, there's probably a higher likelihood that you're gonna succeed in that task as compared to just jumping into it. Oh, I couldn't agree with you more like 1,000,000% man, like 1,000,000%. Like, I see it a lot of times, like, people get the what, you know, they have the what they want to do. Like, they everybody has their watch, right? They want, they want to lose weight, they want to save, you know, 10 grand, they want to do XYZ. But how they, they just don't, they're setting up their selves for failure, because they're not setting up. They're not looking at that house. So like, people do that. And people do it constantly. They do it with either weight loss, or they do it with, you know, running, or they do know, whatever it is like, I'm gonna run a marathon. I want to run a marathon this year. Great. How? Oh, well, I guess I should start running at some point. And it's like, if you don't have that plan at that, like you're like, yeah, like you just said, Man, you set yourself up for failure. If you think you are what my goal is to lose five pounds. Wow. Are you gonna change your diet? Are you gonna start walking more? You're gonna, you know, take care of your body, you're gonna stop drinking so much in the weekend? What are you gonna do? I don't know, I just want to lose weight starting January 1. It's like, Well, good luck, man. But I don't I mean, without without a, you know, concise plan, a concrete plan. You're not gonna it's gonna be a lot more difficult than just going off the cuff. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And that, and that's what you know, ultimately, that's what this show is about in, in, in having guys like yourself on the show to show Hey, someone who again comes from, you know, Phoenix, Arizona, from from south Phoenix and in if you know, the area, it's it's areas where, you know, kids like us, don't come out. But at some point, you know, we can do something with ourselves. One if we change our mindset, but to have we prepare ourselves and understand and make the adjustments necessary, you know, I've hit a wall, you've hit a wall, we were able to at least adjust ourselves enough to jump forward, and then continuously progress. Because again, these these projects in life are ever changing. And if you stay, you know, if you think you're just going to just going to fall into line, and you're just going to, you know, could accomplish what you want without, you know, having any course, or worrying about anything bad happening, you know, again, you're just going to set yourself up for success. Because, again, we all have to adjust as we go along, for the road bumps, you know, unexpected things like family. But again, as I've talked about the last five weeks thinking about the, you know, family members, again, you hit the nail on the head, so many people know, the what, but the how, and the why. And what is, you know, in to break down that what, even further on what it really takes to get your what, you know, what does it really what does it really take? How many hours in the gym is that 50 pounds really gonna cost you? Have you even talked about it? Are you just go to the gym for 30 minutes, like when in your day? Are you going to go to the gym, because you work 12 hours a day, you have two kids at home, you have a wife, like it's just those are the things that I want to help get across to folks, you know, that if you just change your mindset and see one or two things to where you can make tweaks, then anything could be possible. And I think mean, you kind of live through that, that, you know, we've seen it, we've lived it. And now you can take two kids from south Phoenix that are continuously growing, you know, one's a doctor, one's an officer in the military. And we can we're trying to live proof that it can happen, but just the right preparation. Yeah. 1,000% man, like I'm very Yeah, no, I, I can't agree with you more man. And having a you know, have that plan and being able to execute it day in day out is, is probably and it's probably it's probably a more important aspect, consistency and, you know, dedication to whatever you're putting, putting forth like commitment to that plan, I should say, it's probably one of the most more important factors, a grantee, you got to adjust and sometimes, you know, you got to, you know, adjust to reality be pragmatic about whatever that is. Whether it's like, you know, I want to lose 50 pounds in a month and it's like, Yeah, well, good luck. Probably. Just as much luck as growing three inches next month. Do like it. It's nearly impossible to do that in a healthful manner. So yeah, man, I agree with you, man, I think those plans and, you know, being able to execute those things is extremely important. And I think it's also a trait that not a lot of people have, that they need to, they need to, just in general, and I'm thinking to myself, I need to be better about that as well. Yeah, and, you know, when, when I, when I thought about it, you know, when when we first started the show, it was, you know, it's, it's not something revolutionary, a lot of times we do this stuff on a day to day basis, but we just don't realize it, or we do it on other things, you know, and if we can just capture some of that stuff, you know, it's just, you know, I could, I could break it down as simple as, you know, going to get groceries, like, there's, many people may not think about it, but there's tends to be a plan in place of, oh, man, I need to go to the store at, you know, after work at five, here's my list of stuff, I need the food, you know, are needed, you know, it's gonna take me an hour, because I got to get back before XYZ, like we do, we do a lot of these things on, on without blinking an eye and actually realizing some of the stuff that we do on our day to day basis. And just to kind of slow down as we, you know, pinpoint something that we want to accomplish, you know, bigger in life, you know, it's in that was kind of what hit me when, when the show first started was I'm like, man, we do a lot of this stuff on a day, I, you know, I've made the statement on social media that everyone is a project manager, you're a project manager of your life. And then say you are a good project manager, I'm just saying you're a project manager of your life. And if you make a couple small tweaks, or if you realize that you're doing something, you know, you can change the whole outcome of what your life is just by tweaking a few things within your life. 1,000,000% and I think it's, yeah, no, I agree. You know, nothing. It's, like, philosophical, I guess. But, I mean, pretty much every aspect of our life is it's some type of project, right? Yep. So like, you raising your daughter, you have being in a happy marriage, you being successful at work, you being successful, like, those all require management. You know, if you don't consistently, you know, instill certain values in your daughter, you don't if you don't consistently work on, you know, the relationship you add or communication, either support or raiser, you know, 15 years goes by, and she and she's not the person that you you were hoping to be. And then you're wondering, it's like, well, because he didn't fit to your plan you wanted all these things for, but you had no way of being with America. Same thing with career, like, you have these ideas of what you want to do. But you're managing them incorrectly. And I think it's, it's all in, that's not an easy thing to do to have that level of self awareness or to critically think what can I do to be better about whatever this is, that I need to improve upon? I need to work on it. But if you have that, and I mean, that's, that's a powerful person. Most definitely, brother. Well, the bead, I want to thank you, man, and I want you know, I know you're a busy man, and I want to take up too much of your time. But I just want to give one last thing out of you. And if there was one thing that one of our listeners could take away, just in your opinion on a kid coming from south Phoenix to now being a physical therapist in the ER impacting lives, what would be your one piece of advice that you would give that next person or that you've given to someone else, as you see them come, you know, out of bad situations, or have the ability to or want to have the ability to just turn their their life around, maybe hitting that wall in college or a high school student that doesn't know what they really want to do? What would be that one piece of advice. And I and I ended up getting on myself when I was sitting on my soapbox a lot and kind of repeating the same thing, but I think, if I can give if I can give a few, I guess my first one with the and it's some that are so important to me. I had it tattooed on my arm was a book by another book by Ryan Holiday, but it's called the ego is the enemy. Um, I think about most of my successes and most of my failures, nearly all of my failures is because of my ego. Because I thought I didn't have to work that hard, that it was going to get taken care of itself. That I'm fine. That won't happen to me. With my ego talking, failed relationships failed, friendships failed, you know, business ventures was That was my ego talking, failed exam failed, whatever that was my ego talking, but when I sit when I was successful, it was when I put my ego aside when I said, You know, I make mistakes, I'm not as smart as I think I am not. I need to work hard because if I don't, I'm going to fail at this. And I need to keep my humility if I want to succeed, and I tell people that a lot, because I feel like a lot of people, their egos, and they let that that false sense of confidence, get in their way, and it messes them up, it trips them up. Um, I think the the other piece of advice give people the best version of yourself. You know, I think we have, especially nowadays man, there's there's a lot of like, a lot of anger, there's a lot of division, there's a lot of separation. And I think whenever I walk into a patient's room, whenever I interact with a, with a co worker, I want to give them the best version of myself, I want to work as hard as I possibly can. I want to show them as much kindness as much love as much compassion as I can for that one person. Because I have no idea what they're going through. I have no idea what, what they need, but I do want to put my best foot forward for them, I want to be the best person I can be for them for that coworker, for that patient for that friend, for that family member, for that spouse, for that child, whatever it is. They, you know, I want to be the best version of myself for them. Um, so that those would be my two pieces, piece of advice that I would leave with anybody. Awesome, man, again, I definitely appreciate the time. Again, congratulations on all the success and thank you for for what you do, especially, you know, right now, I know you're on the physical therapy side of things, but you know, everything going on, you know, with this pandemic and everything, it's, I tip my hat off to you because you're there on the front lines. I wish you the best and hope that you stay safe. The wife and the kids we send our love, and congratulations on all your success, brother. And when I'm in Phoenix again, I'll make sure we uh, we definitely grab a beer and grab some dinner. Absolutely, man. I'm looking forward to that. Thank you, man. And I'm really proud of you. I'm really happy for everything you have. Beautiful family app. This project man, everything you're doing over there, man, you're doing great things. Man, I can't wait to have that bear with you, bro. Awesome, brother. Stay safe out there, too, man. Thank you. Thanks, everyone. That was Dr. Naveed Shawn, physical therapist out of Phoenix, Arizona. Thank you again, for all the love for all the support. And again, I appreciate everything that you do. And I congratulate you on all your great success and hope you continue to thrive and become one of the best physical therapists out in the Phoenix Arizona area. Guys, that's gonna be it for us this week. Thank you guys for tuning in. And checking out the show. Next week, we'll get back into our topics. And we're gonna start talking about how we, you know, some of those roadblocks and bumps that we we've talked about over the course of today's show. We'll talk about them, and how we adjust fire along the way within our project, and really kind of quality control as well. And we're going to start to get into those topics on how we sit and assess to see if we're going down the right path or not. So I look forward to seeing you guys next week. That's a wrap for this week's episode of the Project Life podcast. Thank you again for tuning in. And if you like what you heard, please be sure to subscribe, like, share with your friends and family. Till next time